Fashion Valet Fail

‘breaking stereotypes and embracing your curves no matter what size you’re in’?

Do you know why that line from Fashion Valet’s Min Luna X page is so much bullshit? Because if Fashion Valet and the designer were really interested in ‘breaking stereotypes’ and ’embracing curves’, they would have …

1) used plus size models instead of the usual ‘regular’ sized one you see modelling the clothes.

How can FV and the designer talk about embracing curves when they’re not willing to embrace any in their campaign? And how are women with curves supposed to assess how these clothes look on themselves, i.e. women who have curves, when they are only shown on a model with next to none?

2) made the clothes available in sizes larger than just the current UK14 maximum. (There’s a limit to embracing one’s curves, I guess.)

3) not given the outfits insulting names like ‘Look Taller’ ‘Hide Your Flaws’, ‘Cover Up Jacket’, ‘Hide Your Bum’, ‘Slimmer Thighs’ and ‘Longer Legs’.

So, first they say women should ’embrace’ their ‘curves’ and are ‘all beautiful’ in ‘unique’ ways and then they suggest that
a) these unique curves should be covered and hidden;

b) that these curvy women who are beautifully unique should aspire to longer legs and slimmer thighs?

c) that these vertically-challenged women should try to look taller because … all heights are uniquely beautiful, but some are more beautiful than others?

d) that these same women should hide their ‘flaws’? What flaws? I thought everyone is beautiful in unique ways?

Perhaps Fashion Valet and Min Luna should think of firing their copywriter.

This fashion line is dodgy has hell, and stinks of insincerity and shallowness. FashionValet.com and Min Luna really need to do better. They need to STOP insulting women and STOP pretending to believe that women of all shapes and sizes are beautiful. It’s obvious that they don’t.

X5
‘Beautiful no matter your size … as long as your size is UK14 and under.’

 

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Ursula K. Le Guin

‘If you cannot or will not imagine the results of your actions, there’s no way you can act morally or responsibly,’ Ursula K. Le Guin in The Guardian, 2005.

 

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She inspired many, and will continue to do so, through her stories, and her ideas and how she expressed them.

I have no words for the loss I feel, the loss I felt when I heard of her death. I surprised myself because I didn’t cry when Maurice Sendak died and when David Bowie died, and I know their work better, more fully, and so, shouldn’t I have felt their loss more acutely?

But it is what it is. (Come to that, neither Sendak nor Bowie’s work has ever made me weep.)

Is it too melodramatic to say that a book changed your life? A Wizard of Earthsea changed mine. It made me look at life differently by telling me things that I knew anyway, but in a manner that suddenly made sense. Maybe it was a matter of timing, maybe not. All I know is that book and the others in the series give me hope like nothing else can; and there are some passages I visit and re-visit like medicine because they clear a space and help me breathe and continue breathing.

Thank goodness we have her words although she is gone. Thank you, Ms Le Guin.

I found this list today, from an article by Karen Joy Fowler, written in response to Le Guin’s death. More wonderful words to live by:

1. There is no reason a book of ideas can’t also be deeply moving, gorgeously written, and inhabited by people who take rooms in your heart and never move out.

2. There is no reason a married woman with children can’t also be a committed artist. (This seems self-evident now but wasn’t immediately clear to me.)

3. Write what you want to write. Add as many dragons as you like.

4. You can regret a decision you made in an earlier book and correct it in a later work. (This is a hard one in our unforgiving times, when your previous missteps are eternal and only a google away. But there is nothing shameful in becoming a better person, a wiser person. Done right, it’s pretty heroic.)

5. The values of patriarchy are buried in the very plots of our stories. New plots are needed.

6. Other writers are not your competition. They are your sustenance. Writing is joyous, but never as joyous as reading.

7. Speak up for the books, poems, shows, music, and paintings you love even though you sound smarter and more discerning when you can’t be pleased.

8. There is no reason why your next book can’t be your best yet, no matter how old you are allowed to become.

9. But also, your next book needn’t be your best yet. You could save that for the next next book.

10. And finally—immortality has never worked out well for anyone. Avoid it at all costs. ~ From Ten Things I Learned from Ursula K. Le Guin by Karen Joy Fowler in The Paris Review blog.

‘Only in silence the word, only in dark the light, only in dying life: bright the hawk’s flight on the empty sky.’ ~ Ursula K. Le Guin, A Wizard of Earthsea

Choosing an Editor

If you are a writer, you may be looking for an editor to help bring your manuscript to the next level. Whether you’re looking for a basic assessment and some advice; structural editing; line editing; a copyeditor, or proofreader, how do you choose someone who is right for you?Read More »

A Tale of Two Writers

A Malaysian writer (A) told me recently about how she had paid another local author (B) to edit her manuscript.

While A was happy with B’s editing, imagine her dismay when B then tweeted a one-line description of her own WIP and the premise sounded similar to A’s.Read More »

Birch Road or Jalan Maharajalela?

DDS7-Jalan-Tun-HS-Lee
Jalan Tun H.S. Lee now and when it used to be Hight Street. This picture is taken from Kuala Lumpur Dahulu dan Sekarang, an article on Poskod.my. Photo Credit: Mohd Radzi Jamaludin’

I didn’t grow up in Kuala Lumpur so I don’t know the old names of the roads and streets in the capital city. By the time I moved to KL (1996), the names had all been changed.

I believe the major renaming happened in 1981 when Mahathir Mohammad was the prime minister. Wiki describes the exercise as a ‘post-independence decolonisation’ effort: the original names of the roads and streets in question were of British public figures. (I’ve been told that Jalan Madge was named after the young daughter of a British official, but I haven’t been able to confirm this. The name of this road has not been changed.)Read More »