It’s all about moimoi

Don’s brother, Iyke, made moimoi the other day so I finally got to try this food that I’ved been reading about in various Nigerian novels.

moi1As far as I can tell it’s made from black eyed peas, onions and fresh chillies, which are blended into a paste. Iyke added shredded fresh mackerel to the mix, which was then double-bagged in plastic and then boiled in water.

I didn’t think the finished product [left] looked very appetising, but it was delicious. And my kids liked it too.

Don says it wasn’t the best he’s had so I look forward to trying the ‘real thing’ in Nigeria.

While looking up moimoi online, I came across this Nigerian recipe website – not that I intend to do any cooking of this sort. I shall leave that to Don: My egg sauce never tastes anywhere as nice as his.

 

 

 

Ipoh getaway

My first proper visit to Ipoh was spent eating and walking about the old town, looking at colonial-era buildings and old shophouses. My sister, Christina, was my guide, and that was the best part of the trip because we haven’t hung out together in ages.

People make a huge fuss about Ipoh food, but I don’t see what’s so great about it. Then again, I’ve never known what the big deal is about Penang food either. I actually prefer Singapore hawker food – this statement outrages Malaysians, but, calm down, it’s just my opinion, OK? I’m from Johor (Segamat and Batu Pahat) and lived for many years in Singapore. Maybe that has shaped my taste preferences, and maybe Singapore food matches what I like more than Ipoh and Penang food does.Read More »

All happy families are alike …

Picture

I’ve just now noticed the picture on the milk carton. The adults are obviously sociopaths who have kidnapped a child so they can go round masquerading as a happy family. (The kid must have been picked by the psychos for his monstrous good looks, which are in keeping with the family’s expression of manic delight.) He is held captive on his ‘father’s’ shoulders lest he should try to make a run for it. Nevertheless, he never stops trying to alert the public of his abduction. Here we see him attempting to tell the photographer what is really going on but his ‘parents’ laugh it off: ‘Isn’t he a funny boy? Always making up stories. So full of imagination!’